acceber74
acceber74:

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School
Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat
Brazil (early 1700s)
Oil on canvas
Philadelphia private collection
[x], [x]
I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:
Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.
Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).
The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.
If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???
How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:
women weren’t artists
Black people weren’t artists
Black people were enslaved
Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”
^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.
If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

Is it possible that the collar is related to this:

http://usslave.blogspot.com/2012/03/story-of-legendary-icon-anastacia.html
Or maybe not… just that is incredulous that a supposed scholar would assume that a woman slave wouldn’t be subjected to the indignity of shackles and collars, when we know that white people did not care about black female slaves.  What happened in Europe varied drastically to how slaves were treated in the colonies anyway, with owners given leeway to treat their property as they saw fit. 

acceber74:

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School

Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat

Brazil (early 1700s)

Oil on canvas

Philadelphia private collection

[x], [x]

I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:

Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.

Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).

The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.

If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???

How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:

  • women weren’t artists
  • Black people weren’t artists
  • Black people were enslaved
  • Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
  • Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
  • white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
  • gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”

^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.

If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

Is it possible that the collar is related to this:

image

http://usslave.blogspot.com/2012/03/story-of-legendary-icon-anastacia.html

Or maybe not… just that is incredulous that a supposed scholar would assume that a woman slave wouldn’t be subjected to the indignity of shackles and collars, when we know that white people did not care about black female slaves.  What happened in Europe varied drastically to how slaves were treated in the colonies anyway, with owners given leeway to treat their property as they saw fit. 

pattilahell
heyheyitsianj:

youwish-youcould:

thefatgawd:

breakingnews:

FBI investigating alleged photo hack of Jennifer Lawrence, others
NBC News: The FBI and Apple announced Monday that they are investigating an apparent hacking of iCloud accounts that lead to photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other female stars being posted online.
A spokesperson for Lawrence said the incident was “a flagrant violation of privacy” and that authorities were poised to prosecute anyone who posted the photos.
Follow updates on BreakingNews.com.
Photo: Actress Jennifer Lawrence on the red carpet of the 2014 Academy Awards. Jordan Strauss / AP

The goddamn FBI is investigating nudes being leaked but we couldn’t even get them to stomp out crooked cops tear gassing citizens for protesting.

Facts


Hmmmmmmm!!!!!

heyheyitsianj:

youwish-youcould:

thefatgawd:

breakingnews:

FBI investigating alleged photo hack of Jennifer Lawrence, others

NBC NewsThe FBI and Apple announced Monday that they are investigating an apparent hacking of iCloud accounts that lead to photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other female stars being posted online.

A spokesperson for Lawrence said the incident was “a flagrant violation of privacy” and that authorities were poised to prosecute anyone who posted the photos.

Follow updates on BreakingNews.com.

Photo: Actress Jennifer Lawrence on the red carpet of the 2014 Academy Awards. Jordan Strauss / AP

The goddamn FBI is investigating nudes being leaked but we couldn’t even get them to stomp out crooked cops tear gassing citizens for protesting.

Facts

Hmmmmmmm!!!!!